New Students

29042013.jpgAnother new week and more great students! We welcome our newest editions Sooyoung, Jihye, Koobeom, Seongbin and Younzi from South Korea, Jie Jing and Rui Miguel from Portugal, Jakub from Czech Republic, Juliana from Colombia and Clarisse, Priscila, Denis and Michelle from Brazil. Welcome to Lexis in Perth everyone, we hope you enjoy your time here with us and please do not hesitate to ask if you have any questions.

ANZAC DAY

Anzac Day
Tomorrow is ANZAC DAY, there will be no school tomorrow but make sure you are back for Friday.

 

Here is a little information about ANZAC DAY.

ANZAC Day – 25 April – is probably Australia’s most important national occasion. It marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War.

 
ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The soldiers in those forces quickly became known as ANZACs, and the pride they took in that name endures to this day.

Australians recognize 25 April as an occasion of national remembrance, which takes two forms. Commemorative services are held at dawn – the time of the original landing in WWI– across the nation. Later in the day, ex-servicemen and women meet to take part in marches through the major cities and in many smaller centers. Commemorative ceremonies are more formal and are held at war memorials around the country. In these ways, ANZAC Day is a time when Australians reflect on the many different meanings of war.

Why is ANZAC DAY so Special?

When war broke out in 1914, Australia had been a federal commonwealth for only 13 years. The new national government was eager to establish its reputation among the nations of the world. In 1915 Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli peninsula in order to open the Dardanelles to the allied navies. The ultimate objective was to capture Constantinople (now Istanbul in Turkey), the capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany.


The Australian and New Zealand forces landed on Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defenders. What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915 the allied forces were evacuated, after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. Over 8,000 Australian soldiers had been killed. News of the landing on Gallipoli had made a profound impact on Australians at home, and 25 April soon became the day on which Australians remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in the war.

Although the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives, the Australian and New Zealand actions during the campaign left us all a powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as the “ANZAC legend” became an important part of the identity of both nations, shaping the ways they viewed both their past and their future.

If you would like to attend a dawn service in your area, find the information in the link below
http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-australia/guide-to-anzac-day-in-wa/story-e6frg13u-1225857527202